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Rally marks International Day to Eradicate Poverty in Halifax

“Poverty is not a human rights issue, it is a human rights violation”

by Robert Devet

A tradition in Halifax.  Each year people living in poverty and their allies rally to mark the United Nations International Day to Eradicate Poverty.  All photos by Robert Devet
A tradition in Halifax. Each year people living in poverty and their allies rally to mark the United Nations International Day to Eradicate Poverty. All photos by Robert Devet
"I have been there, I have been homeless, I have had my power and my lights cut off. In the labour movement we don't stand on the other side of the street and look, we walk with you."  Joan Jessome, president NSGEU
"I have been there, I have been homeless, I have had my power and my lights cut off. In the labour movement we don't stand on the other side of the street and look, we walk with you." Joan Jessome, president NSGEU
Councillor Jennifer Watts joined the march, and later read a proclamation by Mayor Savage declaring October 17 International Day to Eradicate Poverty in HRM.
Councillor Jennifer Watts joined the march, and later read a proclamation by Mayor Savage declaring October 17 International Day to Eradicate Poverty in HRM.
"More than half of families who make under $30,000 a year have no access to the internet at home.  This is absolutely shameful when you consider that you need the internet for everything now. We are targeting the big three of telecommunication, TELUS, Rogers and Bell, and we are taking this to Halifax."  Evan Coole, ACORN Nova Scotia
"More than half of families who make under $30,000 a year have no access to the internet at home. This is absolutely shameful when you consider that you need the internet for everything now. We are targeting the big three of telecommunication, TELUS, Rogers and Bell, and we are taking this to Halifax." Evan Coole, ACORN Nova Scotia
"All of us know that poverty eats at families, at communities, at the soul of the people caught in its web. There is no reason why Canada wouldn't have a guaranteed income that would eliminate poverty and help to build strong individuals, strong families, and strong communities.  Annemieke Vink, Nova Scotia Assoc. of Social Workers
"All of us know that poverty eats at families, at communities, at the soul of the people caught in its web. There is no reason why Canada wouldn't have a guaranteed income that would eliminate poverty and help to build strong individuals, strong families, and strong communities. Annemieke Vink, Nova Scotia Assoc. of Social Workers
Marchers stopped at St.Pat's-Alexandra School to remind Haligonians how City Council intended to sell the surplus property to a private developer against the wishes of the local community.
Marchers stopped at St.Pat's-Alexandra School to remind Haligonians how City Council intended to sell the surplus property to a private developer against the wishes of the local community.

K'JIPUKTUK (Halifax) - On October 17, the International Day to Eradicate Poverty, about one hundred people took to the street to once again remind Haligonians that poverty is still very much a reality in Nova Scotia.

The march wound its way along Gottingen Street and concluded at Brunswick Street United Church, where people sat down for lunch and listened to music and a first voice panel and open mic.

Many of the marchers were living in poverty, but labour, social workers and other allies also made their presence felt.

Along the way people spoke in front the St. Pat's Alexandra School, and at the St. George's Round Church. These locations were chosen because each in their own way highlighted the theme of the event, the discrimination people living in poverty experience every day.

HRM deemed the St. Pat's-Alexandra School surplus in 2011 and proceeded to sell it to a private developer. It took a succesful court action by three community-based non-profit groups for the sale to halt and the non-profits to be offered an opportunity to submit proposals.

"It was an absolute disgrace, but it happened because of lot of people in positions of power consider it ok to run roughshod over people living in poverty, over racial minorities, and over long established communities that happen to be racial minorities living in poverty," said long-time poverty activist Wayne MacNaughton.

The soup kitchen at St. George's Round Church was why the marchers stopped there.

"We shouldn't have to rely on charities and churches to provide basic needs like food. It's just wrong," said MacNaughton.

The march was organized by a coalition of groups working to end poverty in Halifax, including the Community Advocates Network, the Faces of Poverty Consultation, the NSGEU, the Halifax-Dartmouth and District Labour Council, the Community Society to End Poverty in Nova Scotia, the Nova Scotia Association of Social Workers, the North End Community Health Centre and the Nova Scotia Association for Community Living.


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Topics: Poverty
324 words

Commentaires

Step 1:

Step 1 in ending poverty is to end legal theft.
When people have the ability to gain access to the full proceeds of their labor they will have the freedom to choose how and where it is to be spent, instead of our current socialist system where some asshole decides what do do with my money and to whom it goes, usually to a party faithful as a repayment for contributions and support.

What benefits have we seen from endless bureaucratic tape widdling down and syphoning off funds from where tax payers thought and hoped they would go to fund. 

End the legal theft of the wealth of this country and you will be well on your way to ending poverty.

 

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