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Halifax

Between Nations: We Are ALL Treaty People

An evening examining the responsibilities and challenges of upholding the Peace and Friendship Treaties in Mi'kma'ki


6:00pm
- 8:30pm
Monday October 5 2015

Venue: Halifax Central Library (Paul O'Regan Hall)
Cost: Free
Accessibility: Yes; No

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In the mid-1700s Britain signed a series of Peace and Friendship treaties with the Mi'kmaq nation. All who live on this land today - Native and non-Native - have a duty to uphold and live by these agreements. 

October is Mi'kmaq History Month. Join us for an evening examining the responsibilities and challenges in upholding the Peace and Friendship Treaties in Mi'kma'ki.

Monday October 5th, 6:00 PM 
Halifax Central Library, Paul O’Regan Hall

More than a panel discussion: featuring art by Indigenous artists, opportunities for participation and action, light refreshments, and the following speakers:

Naiomi W. Metallic is an associate lawyer at Burchells LLP in Halifax. Originally from the Listuguj Mi’gmaq First Nation on the Gaspé Coast of Québec, Naiomi was the first Mi’gmaq person to clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada. She is a member of her firm’s Aboriginal and Litigation practice groups. She is also a member of Dalhousie’s Board of Governors, as well as a Commissioner with the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission.

Sherry Pictou, former Chief of the Bear River First Nation; member of the Coordinating Committee of the World Forum of Fisher Peoples; Associate Staff with the Bay of Fundy Marine Resource Centre, and Interdisciplinary PhD Candidate, Dalhousie University.

Ben Sichel teaches high school in Dartmouth and writes on education, labour, racism and Aboriginal issues. He holds an M.Ed. in intercultural education and teaches students of all backgrounds the history of colonialism in Mi'kma'ki. He is a member of Solidarity Halifax's anti-racism committee.

Dr. Afua Cooper is is the James Robinson Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies. Her research interests are African Canadian studies, in particular the period of enslavement and emancipation in 18th and 19th century Canada and the Black Atlantic; African-Nova Scotian history; political consciousness; community building and culture; slavery’s aftermath; and Black youth studies. She founded the Black Canadian Studies Association (BCSA), which she currently chairs. 

Moderated by Tayla Paul and Jackie Barkley

Hosted by Solidarity Halifax in partnership with Halifax Public Libraries


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